Saturday, April 4, 2015

Happy Easter to all Sepians !!


This photo is the Sepia Saturday prompt this week. We bloggers try to follow the theme, in some vague way, as a seed in our thoughts. Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.


I do keep an eye on Sepia Saturday now and again, one day I may find time to make more frequent contributions.

Meanwhile, as a tiny contribution, Here are my great aunts Muriel and Constance Dean in October 1898. And in case you wondered why they are dressed so well, I also include a photo of her father John Dean outside his shop in St. Peter's Street, Derby.


Muriel and Constance Dean, October 1898.


John Dean, right, with his shop staff, St Peter's Street, Derby, circa 1904.


John Dean's shop in St Peter's Street, Derby, circa 1898, then trading as Hurd and Dean.


John Dean advertised his shop on the Derby electric trams (1904 onwards). This tram in Osmaston Road, Derby.



19 comments:

  1. Funny what gets noticed in photos: Constance does not have trim around hem of her skirt (Muriel does); I'd give my right arm for those lamps in lower left of third photo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I noticed that and I also wondered. She would have been in her 70s by the time I knew her well, but I can visualise her as a strong willed child who did not allow her draper father to dictate whether or not she had trim round the hem !!

      Delete
    2. Those lamps are long gone, Deb. I noticed that when I wrote an article about the church in St Peter's Street some years ago.

      Delete
  2. I don't think anyone in my family had a bike in 1898, lovely to have a photo of them all dressed up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think your connection to Buffalo Soldiers on bicycles qualifies you to have cycling in your DNA!

      Delete
  3. Nice to see you back Nigel and in the same week as Brett too - what a bounty!! Bang on theme with your charming great-aunts and their father’s shop.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brett and me............. and we had not planned that!! Must be the changing seasons, albeit poor Brett is now heading for his winter !!

      Delete
  4. Great photos. I wonder if the Eaton's store next to Hurd and Dean is related to the Eaton's stores (Timothy Eaton) in Canada? The John Dean windows are quite striking as is the handsome staff. I've been watching Mr. Selfridge and learning a bit about retail sales at the turn of the century. Seems it was a very dynamic and exciting marketplace around that time. One other thing.... In the sign above the shop it says "Ladies Waterproofs". Raincoats I presume.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well...no I doubt it...if you are referring to Timothy Eaton who hailed from Ireland. See:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Eaton. It was a pretty common name, and in trade in Derby in 1910 there was an 'Eaton' tobacconist, architect, body maker, beer retailer, boot shop manager, grocer, bookbinder, greengrocer, wheelwright, clothier and pawnbroker (J D Eaton the one in the photo!), milliner, draper, coal merchant, shoe maker, brick manufacturer and fish retailer !! J D Eaton still survives as a jewellers in Derby. Thanks for making me look this up, I never realised it was such a long established business !!

      Delete
  5. Extraordinary coincidence that you should return to SS in the same week as I chose to. It must, as you say, have something to do with the change of seasons, or the change of life, or whatever ...

    You have so many interesting photographs in your family collection, Nigel, that I hope you do share them with the Saturday Sepians on a more frequent, although not necessarily regular, basis.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What wonderful photographs! The two sisters on bicycles is perfect & maybe Constance wanted a plain skirt just to look that much different than her sister? The street scenes are great & I agree with Deb about the lamps. Beautiful. Too bad they're gone but that's progress I guess.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great Photos, particularly the first one. Re the clothes, it could be something quite as simple as the larger sizes didn't have the trim. The larger size also appears to have a wider belt - four stripes or cords compared to three.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Full marks for this set, Nigel. While Deb may covet street lamps, I'd be very pleased to find one of the lighting fixtures from John Dean's shop! The decorative storefronts from that era are now gone and it's fascinating to see the details.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great photo of your great aunts, and I loved reading everyone's interesting comments. I wonder if the girls were posing in the yard behind the shop?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No....not behind the shop, but here in the yard where I live, also in central Derby. The house was only 3 years old then, built by my great grandfather. I am rather the exception in the area living in a house that has passed through 4 generations, but it also means I have all the photos and ephemera of those generations,so good material for blogging !!

      Delete
  10. How grand that you have photographs of the girls and so photographs of their father's shop and an advertisement on a bus. The girls look very pleased with themselves, more likely (I assume) for being on the bikes than because of their dresses.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a stellar return to SS. You'll be hard pressed to match this post. With such a busy street, I imagine John Dean was very successful.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Very nice clothes to buy and you daughters would be great to advertise the women's wear. All the photos are so great to see.

    ReplyDelete