Thursday, April 18, 2013

Turkey or Roo? Its up to you !...Sepia Saturday 173




This weeks theme: Christmas or Thanksgiving?
Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.

STOP PRESS (April 14th)

A late apology........

On February 16, if you remember, I told you that the Jet Stream would dictate when I could show you the contents of the box in my outside loo. Well it was not until April 14 that the Jet Stream finally shifted and allowed some warm westerly winds that are supposed to keep our climate temperate in England. Hooray! Now we have daffodils at least a month late, and best of all Tommy has finished his hibernation today.

Tommy and Billy re-united !
Tommy is 60 years old plus how many years old he was when we first had him in 1953. It is said he has never grown, so may have been an old adult even then, indeed he may even have met Tim, mascot of the 2/2nd Battalion (Australia).



Now back to turkeys..............


  1. 1.     We don't do Thanksgiving in the UK



  1. 2.     My kids don't eat turkey at Christmas (like real British families)




Some strange tradition developed, now unbreakable, that we always have
Duck à l'Orange on Christmas Day.
You get better smile than from a turkey.



So I have little to write about turkeys.............so I will concentrate on recipes this week.


Yorkshire Puds for Sharon........

A few weeks ago I left a comment for Aussie Sharon-Strong Foundations about old handwritten recipe books left to us by our ancestors, confessing that I really wanted rid of mine, but just did not have the heart to do so. Somehow, I am not sure how, I got onto the subject of Yorkshire Puddings. I was alarmed that she had never tasted such a delicacy, and she wanted the recipe!!

What I can now tell Sharon is that it does not appear in any of my hand written recipe books. But nor does "how to boil an egg" or "how to fill the kettle and make a pot of tea". It seems it was genetically imprinted in my ancestral cooks.....and some mighty fine Yorkshires we used to have when I was small.

But clearly not all Brits had these skills as it was in some of my printed recipe books.........

...but never bother with Mrs Beeton unless you have
 12 children and at least two servants.



An Australian dish Mrs Beeton???
You don't say!!


As an aside...before I forget to show you.....

On the death of an old cousin in 2003 I cleared out his house. He always was a Marmite fan and I found his 1932 free pamphlet recipe book in his pantry. I decided there must be Marmite collectors out there, somewhere, and I was right. I put it on Ebay and the world went mad. I got £28 for it!! For special children there was even a recipe for Marmite jelly!!

Back to the Yorkshire for Sharon...........

These 1936 and 1953 books came with our Radiation cookers, and contain only good solid British cooking.

...and the ovens were PERFECT for Yorkshire puds.

Here's the recipe......




and may I suggest......

  • Regulo 7 translates as 200 celsius (390F)  in an electric fan oven or 215C (420F) in a non fan oven.
  • For baking tin read an open tin you would roast a joint on, approx 14" x 11", 2"-3" high.
  • For quite hot read very hot.
  • For 'Dripping' read ' the fat you had left over after frying the kangaroo tails etc.
  • Eat with the meat and gravy, or as kids we were given the choice of keeping it in the oven for pudding, and having it with Tate and Lyle Golden Syrup.




I am not poking fun at Australian cooking..........

No.....indeed I see my grandmother enjoyed giving my father a good wholesome pudding. Time was no obstacle. 

...but if the Australian pud is a little bland.......try.....


Did Granny imply the Australian pudding was not 'nice' ?



And finally from my Mum's recipe book......

A careful record of the days when we did have turkey at Christmas !!



The End


LATE NEWS.....

I just got this photo emailed from my kitchen by my daughter Alice.....as they say....."the proof of the pudding is in the viewing"


A perfect Yorkshire made to the above blogged recipe !!

Special Late Request....

Kristin  at Finding Eliza wanted to see the photo of my Mum with her pet bantams, circa 1928 after I commented I really should have built them into this weeks blog, so here she is !!






19 comments:

  1. The yorkshire looks delicious. I love the old recipes. These are actually fairly well written. Many of them I've seen leave out steps we now consider critical as young people receive no culinary training at all anymore and even the basics can be misunderstood. Such as "tossing a salad" - need I say more?

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  2. The yorkshire looks delicious. I love the old recipes. These are actually fairly well written. Many of them I've seen leave out steps we now consider critical as young people receive no culinary training at all anymore and even the basics can be misunderstood. Such as "tossing a salad" - need I say more?

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  3. The yorkshire looks delicious. I love the old recipes. These are actually fairly well written. Many of them I've seen leave out steps we now consider critical as young people receive no culinary training at all anymore and even the basics can be misunderstood. Such as "tossing a salad" - need I say more?

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    Replies
    1. Well Helen..........you certainly are very thorough in tossing your salads.!!

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  4. There are certainly some oddities in your post this week!

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  5. I think I'll give the Yorkshire pudding a try, as I've never cooked one.

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  6. Your mother looks so cute and happy holding her little bantams. What a nice photo. Thank you for adding her just for me!

    I've never made Yorkshire Pudding but my mother used to make it sometimes when we had roast beef and it was delicious. It looks very simple and if I ever roast a beef again, I will try it.

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  7. I have never seen ovens like those..... is the place under the upper burners specifically for catching drippings? Or does it serve another purpose?
    I have never had Yorkshire Pudding either. The constant supply of tea survived the family immigration to America, but not the pudding, I guess. I certainly intend to try it one of these days. Glad you posted that picture of your mom!

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  8. No !! Ha Ha !! Its the grill !! They are gas hobs/grill/oven of course. We still use a gas hob, as you can adjust the heat with immediate effect. It just looks a little more modern !!

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    Replies
    1. Happy to provide a good laugh for you today! :) I've never heard of a hob either. I obviously need to brush up on all things British.

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  9. Marmite?? Now that's really an oddity for me. I like the photo of your mom and the chickens.

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  10. I make Yorkshire pudding all the time, even though my Irish mom never did. Love it!!
    As always a thoroughly entertaining post.
    When we downsized last year i found a blogging friend who I knew would like my old cookbooks so I mailed them to her.

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  11. wow, so much information. I love that daffidils have finally bloomed, everything's so late this year. your tortoise is looking great, bet he's refreshed after an extra long sleep.

    and marmite book - cool but not in jelly

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  12. Ah Yorkshire pudding - there is nothing better. The secret, of course, as Stanley Holloway used to say, is to "mix it with love"

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  13. We recently had a house guest from Britain who brought a extra large gift of Marmite for my wife who has been unable to find it in the States. I can't believe there are 60 recipes for it, so that is definitely very odd.

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  14. Interesting post, Nigel. I never really knew what Yorkshire pudding was so I was happy to see it was something that I would actually eat. Now the Kangaroo Tail soup, I'm thinking, NO! Never heard of Marmite, but you are correct there is buyer for everything on eBay. The photo of your mother with the bantams is very sweet.

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  15. So you're an Ozzy in the UK? I'd-nay on the kangaroo tail; I prefer mine alive and hopping, if you please! I am fascinated with your "Tommy". I christened a baby squirrel with that name, but it's doubtful he will last as long! 😉

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  16. That was meant to be IX - NAY, by the way.

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  17. Good heavens...No ! I am British in England !!
    I'm not sure about this new word "IXNAY" entering my vocabulary...my brain is already too full of useless data (useful only for gaps in blogs)...is it this word?
    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ixnay

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